Walk it off: how I sort of accidentally fell in love with walking.

I know, walking – it’s been done. Old people can’t get enough of it. They wear New Balance sneakers and high-vis vests and scowl disapprovingly at scantily-clad runners oblivious to the world courtesy of their sporty earbuds. In my quest to lose weight (and save a bit of money), though, I’ve started walking more. A lot more.

I’ve thought about joining a gym for a while, but after taking a tour of the one reasonably-priced local facility I was interested in, I wasn’t exactly enthusiastic about this option anymore. The employees really, really wanted to help. And that’s cool, but I feel like personal trainers / fitness enthusiasts have a hard time understanding what it’s like coming out of three years of an inactive lifestyle and want to help too much. I was told I’d be wasting my money just coming in for cardio machines, and should do aerobic classes, weight training, nutrition plan, etc. I like to think I’m realistic when I say that’s not going to happen for me. Not at the point I’m at, not yet. It’s too much. I’d give up, and I’d feel inadequate if I was told my workout routine wasn’t taking full advantage of my membership. So I passed on that route, and saved my $40 / month.

I pondered my other options. Buy a used road bike? Kind of expensive and, frankly, a little dangerous anywhere in Los Angeles. A home cardio machine was well out of my budget, even used. Hiking is a bit daunting, and I’ve never felt comfortable doing it by myself in rattlesnake country. So what’s cheap, healthy, and practical? Well, as it turns out, walking.

I’d started walking before back in March, but at the time I was having radicular nerve pain in my calves from a car accident I had in January this year. It made all but an easy pace on a flat surface very difficult, and painful, to maintain. I’ve since recovered quite a bit from that injury, and it no longer bothers me.

Three weeks ago I started again. My plan was simple: the carrot on a stick approach. Every day after work, I walked to get dinner. A salad at Chipotle (no rice, dressing, or guacamole, regular portions). It’d easily save me a dollar in gas every day (really more than that, because I’d drive further to get food), and I’d work up an appetite by the time I got there.

I started off slowly, and without any fitness trackers. Just me, my triple-seal earbuds, and a Pandora classic jazz station.

The more I walked, the more I liked it, though. It wasn’t super easy at first (it still isn’t, as I push my pace upward), but it had an less expected benefit: it relieved stress. The more I pushed myself, the more my anxieties and worries sort of melted away. I think that’s kind of what’s getting me hooked on it – some part of my brain is nudging me and saying “hey, this makes you feel better, do it!” So I’ve kept doing it. And the more I do it, the easier it becomes to stay committed to the pattern.

I walk 3 (or more) miles a day, five days a week, split into 1.5 mile intervals with a half hour break in between for dinner. I began using fitness tracker apps a couple weeks back, and have been watching my pace get better and better. I think I started at 22 minutes / mile, but as happens when you start focusing on improving a number, that number got better. Within a couple days it was 20 minutes. Now, I’m down to 18 minutes a mile. I want to break 15. And at that point, I want to start jogging in intervals (trust me, I cannot jog after three years of sedentary lifestyle and weight gain. I tried – once, last week. It did not go well).

But the really great thing? I’ve discovered walking is kind of awesome. And not simply the act, but the entire philosophy of setting aside an hour and a half (or thereabouts) of my day every day to do this one thing that improves my health, and that just flat out makes me feel better.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s